Good News For the Baby Blues

Good News For the Baby Blues

June 7, 2013 9:19 am 4,731 comments

hIt’s not uncommon to experience the “baby blues” after giving birth. Skin-to-skin contact between mom and baby might be an effective way to alleviate postpartum sorrows. Support and encourage skin to skin moments with Actively HealthyTM ingredients.

In this article…

  • Blue is Not Your Best Color
  • Skin to Skin and Postpartum Depression
  • Loving the Skin You’re In (and Baby’s Too!)

Many women experience some form of the baby blues after giving birth. The good news is caring for yourself and baby through touch can help alleviate symptoms of depression. Choose the right skin care products to support these skin to skin moments.

Blue is Not Your Best Color

It’s not uncommon to experience the “baby blues” after giving birth. The sudden shift in hormones, the lack of sleep and the transition into parenthood can all contribute to feelings of sadness, anxiety or being overwhelmed. Postpartum depression can be more than just a serious case of the blues; it can interfere with your ability to take care of yourself and your little one. Seeking help and support to alleviate these feelings is paramount to feeling better.

Skin to Skin and Postpartum Depression

A recent study in the Journal of Obstetric, Gynecological, and Neonatal Nursing showed that skin-to-skin contact between mom and baby might be an effective alternative for mothers trying to avoid taking medication to alleviate their postpartum depression.

In the study, their data showed that new mothers who had at least six hours of skin-to-skin contact during the first week of their baby’s birth followed by at least two hours a day in the month following reported fewer depressive symptoms.  Saliva samples showed lower cortisol levels (an indicator of stress in the body, than the moms who did not have as much skin to skin time with their newborns.

Skin to skin contact with your baby can raise your levels of oxytocin, a “feel-good” hormone. Even in cases where medication is needed to help relieve postpartum depression symptoms, skin to skin time with baby can also be an integral part of feeling better.

Another study showed that skin-to-skin contact with baby at least three hours a day reduced baby crying by as much as 43 percent. And those babies not fell asleep faster but for longer too. This in turn means more sleep and less stress for mom.

Loving the Skin You’re In

Whether cradling your naked baby against bare skin, massaging or simply caressing your baby’s face, ample skin to skin contact is critically important for both you and baby. Choosing skin care products that support and encourage skin to skin moments with Actively Healthy™ ingredients further enhances those benefits.

Caring for yourself and baby through touch can help alleviate symptoms of depression. Once baby is a few weeks old, you can massage lightly her with a natural, unscented oil that supports skin barrier properties [Massage Serum]. Getting yourself a professional massage can also help reduce the stress symptoms that usually accompany postpartum depression.

Sources

Br J Psychiatry. 1999 Dec;175:554-8.

Post-partum depression and the mother-infant relationship in a South African peri-urban settlement.

Cooper PJ, Tomlinson M, Swartz L, Woolgar M, Murray L, Molteno C.

Can J Psychiatry. 2007 Aug;52(8):479-88.

Perinatal depression: hiding in plain sight.

Lusskin SI, Pundiak TM, Habib SM.

Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, & Neonatal Nursing

Volume 41, Issue 3, pages 369–382, May/June 2012

Ann Bigelow*, Michelle Power, Janis MacLellan-Peters, Marion Alex, Claudette McDonald

 

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